CAR OF GOOD HOPE. THE BMW 1800 SA.

Rewind to the early 1960s and BMW was in the midst of its successful fightback from the brink – spearheaded by a range of new models. The 02 range launched in 1966 to boost the ranks of volume-produced models was built in unprecedented numbers and BMW was soon bursting at the seams. Step forward Hans Glas GmbH. The debt-ridden company had a production facility in the relatively nearby Bavarian town of Dingolfing and could provide urgently needed capacity to ease the burden on BMW’s Munich plant. Glas was duly taken over by BMW in 1966.

The Glas 1700 was presented in 1964 to widespread industry acclaim. Praise centred on its body, designed by Pietro Frua in Turin, which – in its compact and sporting character – fitted the same profile and targeted the same audience as BMW’s “New Class” revealed two years earlier. It even featured the same eye-catching kink in the C-pillar. The two cars also shared similar displacement and output, the Glas developing 80 hp in 1700 guise and a princely 100 hp in TS dual-carburettor form.

Bad debts and a dire need for investment.
However, Glas was crippled by debt and struggling to find a way out of the mire. Profits had to be ploughed back into new models to avoid losing touch with the company’s competitors. The Glas production facilities were outdated, in some cases somewhat improvised, affairs, and fresh capital was conspicuous by its absence. By 1966 it was clear a takeover was the only way to avoid liquidation. For BMW this was a chance to get its hands on a perfect new facility at close enough proximity to its main plant in Munich and ready-stocked with a well trained workforce who could hit the ground running. BMW halted production of the Glas 1700 in 1967, unable to find a business case for the model alongside its own, strong-selling 1800 and 2000.

Farewell Germany.
That wasn’t quite the end of the story, though. The Glas had been a fundamentally successful car and soon found someone who wanted to start building it again: Johannes Hermanus Pretorius in South Africa. The decision was made to ship the Glas production machinery to South Africa, and in the meantime the car was assembled there from CKD kits. This also enabled the company to sidestep the protectionist tariffs levied on imported cars in completed form. Only the engines and gearboxes were not produced in-house (they were brought over from Munich), the 1800’s four-cylinder 90 hp unit representing a perfect fit. The South African Glas BMWs could be identified immediately, of course, by their obligatory right-hand drive, but otherwise the only distinguishing features were the BMW badges and boot lid lettering. A small number of the cars were also built in neighbouring Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and known as the “Cheetah”.

Grow and prosper.
Not long after production got underway, the BMW 1800 SA was joined by the more powerful BMW 2000 SA. In 1973 its body design was updated to include a front end which reflected the BMWs of the time. These facelifted models were named BMW 1804 SA / BMW 2004 SA. BMW took complete control of the South African plant in 1974 and also began production of the 5 Series there.

The final examples of the four-door Glas that became a BMW rolled off the assembly line in 1974. It’s thought almost 10,000 units were built, and with a little luck you might still spot one gracing the roads around the Cape today. It has long enjoyed classic car status in South Africa, but remains largely under the radar at home – a veritable exotic. The Glas BMW sowed the seeds for the glowing reputation the BMW brand enjoys in South Africa today. And it has a fascinating story to tell about the fluctuating fates of cars in times of rapid change.

The BMW 1800 SA was a pricey and exclusive model for customers in the relatively small South African car market. It laid the foundations for BMW to expand its presence in the country.

The BMW 1800 SA was a pricey and exclusive model for customers in the relatively small South African car market. It laid the foundations for BMW to expand its presence in the country.

The production machinery for the Glas 1700 was transported to South Africa in 1968 and used to build the BMW 1800 SA. The engine and gearbox for the BMW 1800 were shipped over from Munich.

The production machinery for the Glas 1700 was transported to South Africa in 1968 and used to build the BMW 1800 SA. The engine and gearbox for the BMW 1800 were shipped over from Munich.

The Glas gradually morphed into a BMW in South Africa. Pictured is the facelifted 1804 SA / 2004 SA built from 1973.

The Glas gradually morphed into a BMW in South Africa. Pictured is the facelifted 1804 SA / 2004 SA built from 1973.

The front end was the most prominent aspect of the design brought into line with its BMW stablemates in 1973. The rear remained largely unchanged.

The front end was the most prominent aspect of the design brought into line with its BMW stablemates in 1973. The rear remained largely unchanged.

A study of a facelifted model in 1970. The car fitting this template was built from 1973 under the new model designation 1804 SA / 2004 SA.

A study of a facelifted model in 1970. The car fitting this template was built from 1973 under the new model designation 1804 SA / 2004 SA.

A rear view of the same 1970 study car – still bearing the 2000 SA badge. The revised model would become known as the 2004 SA in series production guise.

A rear view of the same 1970 study car – still bearing the 2000 SA badge. The revised model would become known as the 2004 SA in series production guise.

From the front, the 2004 SA recalled the 2500/2800 (E3) and the CS models.

From the front, the 2004 SA recalled the 2500/2800 (E3) and the CS models.

A German-registered BMW 1800 SA at the Munich plant in 1968. Sections of the asymmetrical low-beam headlights had to be masked off when the car switched from driving on the left-hand side of the road to the right-hand side.

A German-registered BMW 1800 SA at the Munich plant in 1968. Sections of the asymmetrical low-beam headlights had to be masked off when the car switched from driving on the left-hand side of the road to the right-hand side.